Journalist. Activist. Freelancer. Twarrior.

Tag Archive for ‘rhodes university’

Son of Transkei soil joins Concourt bench

By MICHELLE SOLOMON MOUNT Frere-born advocate Mbuyiseli Russell Madlanga was yesterday sworn in as a Constitutional Court judge. The latest addition to the Concourt bench brings a host of notable achievements. Mdlanga was born in Njijini village in 1962, and despite his apartheid-era education managed to come top of his class throughout his tertiary education…. Read More ›

Confession: You might wanna get tested – slut-shaming and HIV

So the latest outrage sparked by the Rhodes Confessions page is one student telling an anonymous woman that she ought to get tested after a hook-up. And slut-shaming ensued, of course. But so did a lot of condemnation and safe-sex advocacy.

Rhodes Confessions page – is this how we want to represent Rhodes?

Since I’m been blamed for taking down the first Confessions page even though I didn’t, I’ll take credit where it’s due and highlight the beyond the pale posts on the new one.

PHOTOS: Silent Protest, by Adrian Frost

Some incredible photos of me while at the Silent Protest. All these pics were taken by the extraordinarily talented Adrian Frost. Read his post on the SP and see more of his pics here.

Rhodes academics can’t show solidarity with Silent Protest, need their own special march

See below the latest move from Rhodes University. Apparently most Rhodes academics are too special to show solidarity at the country’s biggest anti-rape protest and Rhodes rape survivors – they need their own special march where they can wear their “academic regalia” in solidarity. Yes, because seeing you prance around in your bat capes when… Read More ›

Anti-Harassment Act heralds end to cyberstalking

A NEW law against stalking and harassment came into effect over the weekend after many years of campaigning by sexual violence NGOs.
The Protection from Harassment Act (PHA) was adopted by parliament in 2011, and came into effect on Saturday April 27.
In a statement the Department of Justice (DoJ) explained that the PHA would provide South Africans with an in expensive civil remedy to deal with harassment, mainly by means of a court order preventing the harasser from con tinuing with the unwanted behaviour. Any person that con travenes such a court order is guilty of an offence and liable to fine and/or a maximum prison sentence of five years, according to the DoJ.
A Rhodes University student spoke to the Daily Dispatch about an online stalker that has been harassing her since October 2012. The student asked not to be named.

Silent Protest 2012 in City Press

The City Press reports on the 2012 Silent Protest, for which I was media liaison. Check out an interview with me about why we protest.

Declining internet freedom in Russia – Alexey Sidorenko

Internet freedom and access to information is increasingly at risk as mega-powers like Russia and China seek to limit outgoing information flows and dissent, said Alexey Sidorenko of Russia-based Teplitsa. Sidorenko was the keynote speaker of day two of the annual Highway Africa conference on media development hosted by Rhodes University, Grahamstown.

Reclaiming the term ‘rape survivor’

There are times when silence is more eloquent and expressive than shouts of protest, or words spoken in the face of ignorance. The Silent Protest seeks to embody this silence in solidarity with rape survivors who, for whatever reason, are not able to speak out about the violence exerted on them and their bodies. The Silent Protest also serves to make a space for those survivors who know and have experienced the deep vault of secrecy to come forward in a safe space, and make their voices heard. On this day, these survivors who feel they are able to come forward wear a T-shirt identifying themselves as a “Rape Survivor”.

1in9 protest organiser, Larissa Klazinga, hugs another protester. Picutre: RICHARD STUPART.

Statement: Silent Protest

There are different reports for the numbers of rape survivors who don’t report their rape for fear of reprisal. Some say 1 in 4, 1 in 9, 1 in 20. The statistic most frequently used by the South African Police Services to calculate the number of survivors who report their assault (in relation to those that don’t) is 1 in 35.

July 2016
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